updated 7:50 PM MDT, May 24, 2017

Americas

From Somalia To America And Finding A Home In Minnesota

Minnesota has one of the largest Somali refugee populations in the country.

But it wasn't long ago the first Somali family called Mankato home.

For a long time, it was home.

Chairman of Somali Community Barwaaqo Organization Hussein Jama said, "I live a good life. I was working with the White House, like say the White House here. We call it Villa Somalia. The president is there. So, I was working there as a financial. I was doing Department of Finance over there for 10 years."

Then in 1990, everything changed, with a civil war that continues today, and with a government job, that made Hussein Jama a target.

Hussein Jama said, "I left from my family, and I get a ticket to come to Cairo."

Hussein eventually made his way to the United States, but it was alone.

KEYC

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: AMERICAS

Hell to Heartland: Mogadishu, Minnesota and Economic Opportunity

  
Hell to Heartland: Mogadishu, Minnesota and Economic Opportunity

The money is flowing back and forth. The goods are travelling over land and seas. And a cottage industry of remittances is transferring $2 billion between Minnesota and Somalia.

Innovative, driven Somalis are flooding Somalia with new small businesses. But a trade deal between Somalia and the U.S. doesn't exist yet. It's now a work in progress, and the man cutting the deal is a former Minnesotan.

He knows all roads may not lead to Rome, but they lead to a new dawn in Mogadishu. As he stands on his roof, his favorite place in the Ministerial palace, Abdi Aynte knows he's exactly where he needs to be, where his calling brought him.

He's one of the highest ranking government officials in the new Somali government and a former journalist and Minnesotan. He's 8,000 miles away from Minnesota in Mogadishu, in a city where every door opened only to destruction for the last 25 years.
Mogadishu, Somalia

Mogadishu, Somalia
KSTP/Video

"A lot of destroyed buildings, a lot of new buildings coming up, you see a mix of life, you see this country is actually going through something," he says.

That something drives Aynte to keep pushing into his purpose.

"I'm reminded how privileged I am and the extremely difficult work to be done," he said.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: AMERICAS

How American Special Operators Gradually Returned to Somalia

A U.S. soldier was killed in the country this month for the first time in more than two decades. What was he doing there?

    Mark Moyar
   


The death of Navy SEAL Kyle Milliken and the wounding of two more U.S. troops in Somalia this month marked the first deadly engagement for American forces in the country since the Battle of Mogadishu of October 1993. The two events differ in notable respects, not least in their magnitude—the battle of October 3-4, 1993, resulted in 18 Americans killed and 79 wounded. But both operations reflect the adverse conditions that U.S. special-operations forces, and the United States more broadly, face in the world’s most dysfunctional states.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: AMERICAS

Second Trump travel ban gets appeals hearing in Seattle Monday

President Donald Trump's lawyers will head to court in Seattle Monday, trying to get his second travel ban on six majority-Muslim countries reinstated.

Lawyers will present arguments to the U.S. 9th Circuit of Appeals for Hawaii vs. Trump. That same body previously ruled against Trump's first travel ban -- a ban that was immediately challenged by Washington state.

Hawaii-based U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson, in March, placed a hold on Trump's plan to temporarily suspend immigration from the six majority-Muslim countries - Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen - striking another legal blow against the president's attempts to institute a travel ban.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: AMERICAS

Somali Asylum seeker charged with assault says he's not violent



Ahmed Aden Ali, 37, denies he assaulted a CBSA officer at the Emerson, Man., border crossing on April 8 and hopes Canada will give him another chance to stay here. (Karen Pauls, CBC News)


A Somali asylum seeker charged with assaulting a border guard in Emerson, Man., is pleading his case to stay in Canada.

"I hope they give me a chance to prove myself that I've changed," 37-year-old Ahmed Aden Ali said Tuesday from his lawyer's office in Winnipeg.

Ali, along with members of his family, had been living in Minneapolis as government-sponsored UNHCR convention refugees since 1999. Most of his family members are still in the U.S.

  • Written by Abdullahi
  • Category: AMERICAS